I'm not good enough

I'm not good enough to write, to run, to sing, to paint, do karate, or whatever. Whatever you finish the sentence with, it’s simply not true. This is a phrase Resistance will use to convince you to not do whatever your heart is telling you that you should be doing. Resistance employs every dirty trick in the book. It lies, it will distract you, tell you it's ok start later, but when it rationalizes, I believe it's at its most nefarious. Rationalization is the process whereby Resistance will leverage a truth and twist it in the hopes of holding you back.

Truth: there are people who are better writers, better painters, better at whatever it is you should be pursuing. You should not let this hold you back.


For those who recognize the vocabulary, I recently finished the War of Art by Steven

Pressfield. This is a classic text that I try to read (or listen to the audiobook) at least once a year, particularly this time of year when motivation plummets. Pressfield labels Resistance as that force that attempts to stop you from doing anything creative that your heart tells you that you should be doing. This applies to working out, pursuing an art, waking up early, and procrastination in general. Once you recognize Resistance, then you can take steps to defeat it. In The War of Art, Pressfield lists all of the tools and tricks of Resistance. He then goes on to describe what it means to turn Pro and win your inner creative battles. I particularly enjoy his writings on the Muses. I can’t recommend this book enough.